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After submission, A manuscript number will be mailed to the corresponding author same day or within 24 hours. The submitting author takes responsibility for the paper during submission and peer review. Papers must be submitted on the understanding that they have not been published elsewhere (except in the form of an abstract or as part of a published lecture, or thesis) and are not currently under consideration by another journal. The submitting author is responsible for ensuring that the article's publication has been approved by all the other coauthors. All manuscripts are reviewed by an editor and members of the Editorial Board or qualified outside reviewers. Decisions will be made as rapidly as possible, and the journal strives to return reviewers’ comments to authors within one weeks. The editorial board will re-review manuscripts that are accepted pending revision. It is the goal of the CNB journals to publish manuscripts within 4 weeks after submission.


Paper style laws


Text


Font: Times new roman


Font Size: 12


No Columns


 


Main Headings


Following main headings should be provided in the manuscript while preparing.


Main headings should be numbered in the manuscript.


 


1. Title page


 


1.1. Title: The title should be relatively short but informative. 


1.2. Name(s) of author(s): A list of all authors of the paper should be prepared. It will contain full first name, initial(s) for middle name(s) and full last name.


1.3. Name and address of workplace(s): Authors’ affiliations should be indicated in this section. 


1.4. Personal e-mail address: At least one e-mail address is needed. It will be used as the corresponding author’s email address in all contacts with the authors.


 


2. Abstract


 


An abstract must accompany every article. It should be a brief summary of the significant items of the main paper. It should be informative and not only present the general scope of the paper but also indicate the main results and conclusions. An abstract should not normally exceed 350 words. 


 


3. Keywords


 


List of all keywords proposed by the authors, separated by commas. Between 3-6 keywords can be selected. We would suggest avoid repeating the title.


 


4. Introduction


 


Present the subject of paper clearly, indicate the scope of the subject, and present the goals of paper, novelty of research work and finally the organization of paper.


 


5. Materials and Methods


 


This should be complete enough to provide sufficient detail to allow the work to be repeated by others. However, only truly new procedures should be described in detail; previously published procedures should be cited, and important modifications of published procedures should be mentioned briefly. Capitalize trade names and include the manufacturer's name and address. Subheadings should be used. Methods in general use need not be described in detail.


Experimental Part: It should be written in sufficient detail to enable others to repeat the authors’ work. 


Computational Part: In theoretical papers, technical details such as the computational methods, and models applied or newly developed models should be presented in an appropriately named section. Sufficient detail should be provided to enable readers to reproduce the calculations.


 


6. Results and Discussion


 


It may be combined or kept separate and may be further divided into subsections. This section should not contain technical details. Abbreviations and acronyms should be used sparingly and consistently. Where they first appear in the text, they should be defined; authors may also explain large numbers of abbreviations and acronyms in a footnote on the first page.


 


7. Conclusion


 


It should be representing the summary of the important findings.


 


Acknowledgements


Information concerning research grant support should appear in a separate Acknowledgements section at the end of the paper, not in a footnote. 


 


Tables


Authors should use tables only to achieve concise presentation or where the information cannot be given satisfactorily in other ways. Tables should be numbered consecutively using Arabic numerals and should be in the text itself at appropriate place not at the end or as separate attachment. Each table should have an explanatory caption which should be as concise as possible.


 


Figures


Authors may use line diagrams and photographs to illustrate these from their text. The figures should be clear, easy to read and of good quality. Styles and fonts should match those in the main body of the article. Lettering and lines should be of uniform density and the lines unbroken. Axis labels should be in bold face. Units should be placed next to variables in parentheses. All figures must be in the text itself appropriate place not at the end or as separate attachment.


 


8. References 


Bibliographic references in the text appear like [1, 2, 5, 6], using square brace in superscript. References should be numbered consecutively, with style:


 


Journal paper: 


 


1. Hadjibabaie, M., N. Rastkari, A.Rezaie and M. Abdollahi, 2005. The Adverse Drug Reaction in the Gastrointestinal Tract: An Overview. Intl. J. Pharmacol., 1 (1): 1-8. 


 


Books:


 


1. Daniel A. Potter, 2002. Destructive turfgrass insects: Biology, diagnosis and control. Wiley Canada Publishers, pp: 24-67.


 


Chapters in Book:


 


1. Bray R.A., 1994. The leucaena psyllid. In: Forage Tree Legumes in Tropical Agriculture (eds R.C. Gutteridge and H.M. Shelton) pp. 283–291. CAB International, Oxford.


 


Titles of journals should be given in full. ‘In press' can only be used to cite manuscripts actually accepted for publication in a journal. Citations such as ‘manuscript in preparation' or ‘manuscript submitted' are not permitted. Data from such manuscripts can only be mentioned in the text as ‘unpublished data'.


 


A Report: 


 


1. Makarewicz, J.C., T. Lewis and P. Bertram, 1995. Epilimnetic phytoplankton and zooplankton biomass and species composition in Lake Michigan, 1983-1992. U.S. EPA Great Lakes National Program, Chicago, IL. EPA 905-R-95-009.


 


Conference Proceedings: 


 


1. Stock, A., 2004. Signal Transduction in Bacteria. In the Proceedings of the 2004 Markey Scholars Conference, pp: 80-89. 


 


A Thesis: 


 


1. Strunk, J.L., 1991. The extraction of mercury from sediment and the geochemical partitioning of mercury in sediments from Lake Superior, M. S. thesis, Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI.

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